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Re: Distributor seized up, ( DATA )

BD
Bob Dunahugh
Sat, Sep 11, 2021 3:43 PM

I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine block. At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I have laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher in the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the shortest already. Then there's another issue.  By shimming the distributor up. The distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on the driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on the very end of that driven gear.)
As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor drive gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what stop/stops?  Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the pick-up coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some around. But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN.  I've said for about a year now.  That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed back then.
Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one.
Bob Dunahugh
78 Royale since 2003
4 real COPO Yenkos

I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine block. At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I have laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher in the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the shortest already. Then there's another issue. By shimming the distributor up. The distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on the driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on the very end of that driven gear.) As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor drive gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what stop/stops? Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the pick-up coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some around. But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN. I've said for about a year now. That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed back then. Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one. Bob Dunahugh 78 Royale since 2003 4 real COPO Yenkos
BD
Bob Dunahugh
Sat, Sep 11, 2021 5:46 PM

Ken S had to go to a wedding today. When he gets free. I'm going to use my inspection camera. To get a closer look in there from the top. May need to look inside the oil pan.
Bob Dunahugh


From: Bob Dunahugh
Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2021 10:43 AM
To: gmclist@list.gmcnet.org gmclist@list.gmcnet.org
Subject: RE: Distributor seized up, ( DATA )

I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine block. At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I have laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher in the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the shortest already. Then there's another issue.  By shimming the distributor up. The distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on the driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on the very end of that driven gear.)
As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor drive gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what stop/stops?  Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the pick-up coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some around. But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN.  I've said for about a year now.  That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed back then.
Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one.
Bob Dunahugh
78 Royale since 2003
4 real COPO Yenkos

Ken S had to go to a wedding today. When he gets free. I'm going to use my inspection camera. To get a closer look in there from the top. May need to look inside the oil pan. Bob Dunahugh ________________________________ From: Bob Dunahugh Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2021 10:43 AM To: gmclist@list.gmcnet.org <gmclist@list.gmcnet.org> Subject: RE: Distributor seized up, ( DATA ) I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine block. At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I have laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher in the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the shortest already. Then there's another issue. By shimming the distributor up. The distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on the driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on the very end of that driven gear.) As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor drive gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what stop/stops? Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the pick-up coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some around. But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN. I've said for about a year now. That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed back then. Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one. Bob Dunahugh 78 Royale since 2003 4 real COPO Yenkos
JH
James Hupy
Sat, Sep 11, 2021 5:46 PM

Problem is NOT in the distributor! It is the drive shaft, and the spring
clip that is supposed to be located in that free zone between the top of
the oil pump and the engine block. I suspect that you could just get hold
of the distributor drive shaft, and a slight pull could have it in your
hand. Which is NOT HOW it should be. It should remain in the engine when
you invert the engine like you do when torquing the crank bearings, etc. It
is usually the next to the last thing that I install when buttoning up the
lower end of an engine.
Been bitten by that gremlin once, a long time ago in a far away land
known as my foray into the automotive machine shop business with an
alcoholic partner. But, that is at least a two beer story!
Jim Hupy
Salem, Oregon

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 8:43 AM Bob Dunahugh yenko108@hotmail.com wrote:

I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from
the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine block.
At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we
could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I have
laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher in
the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has
measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the shortest
already. Then there's another issue.  By shimming the distributor up. The
distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In
relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on the
driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on the
very end of that driven gear.)
As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor drive
gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what stop/stops?
Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the pick-up
coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some around.
But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN.  I've said for about a year
now.  That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed
back then.
Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the
engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one.
Bob Dunahugh
78 Royale since 2003
4 real COPO Yenkos


GMCnet mailing list
Unsubscribe or Change List Options:

Problem is NOT in the distributor! It is the drive shaft, and the spring clip that is supposed to be located in that free zone between the top of the oil pump and the engine block. I suspect that you could just get hold of the distributor drive shaft, and a slight pull could have it in your hand. Which is NOT HOW it should be. It should remain in the engine when you invert the engine like you do when torquing the crank bearings, etc. It is usually the next to the last thing that I install when buttoning up the lower end of an engine. Been bitten by that gremlin once, a long time ago in a far away land known as my foray into the automotive machine shop business with an alcoholic partner. But, that is at least a two beer story! Jim Hupy Salem, Oregon On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 8:43 AM Bob Dunahugh <yenko108@hotmail.com> wrote: > I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from > the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine block. > At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we > could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I have > laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher in > the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has > measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the shortest > already. Then there's another issue. By shimming the distributor up. The > distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In > relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on the > driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on the > very end of that driven gear.) > As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor drive > gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what stop/stops? > Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the pick-up > coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some around. > But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN. I've said for about a year > now. That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed > back then. > Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the > engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one. > Bob Dunahugh > 78 Royale since 2003 > 4 real COPO Yenkos > _______________________________________________ > GMCnet mailing list > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: >
KH
Ken Henderson
Sat, Sep 11, 2021 6:05 PM

Jim,

You're correct:  I examined a brand new shaft today, which had the stop in
place (actually 2 push-on spring washers back-to-back).  Since Ken Shaffer
can pull his shaft out, those washers are no longer in place.  Then I found
among my jump a used shaft with those washers also missing (including scars
where they'd been pulled off).  That shaft shows, below the previous stop
washers' location, wear where it seated about 1/2" into the oil pump.  At
the other end, there are scars from about 1" seated in the distributor
shaft.

My question now is, WHY is the stop necessary, other than for assembly, as
you described?  With the oil pump limiting downward motion and the
distributor preventing upward travel, WHY are the washers essential?

Just curious, really,

Ken H.

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 1:46 PM James Hupy jamesh1296@gmail.com wrote:

Problem is NOT in the distributor! It is the drive shaft, and the spring
clip that is supposed to be located in that free zone between the top of
the oil pump and the engine block. I suspect that you could just get hold
of the distributor drive shaft, and a slight pull could have it in your
hand. Which is NOT HOW it should be. It should remain in the engine when
you invert the engine like you do when torquing the crank bearings, etc. It
is usually the next to the last thing that I install when buttoning up the
lower end of an engine.
Been bitten by that gremlin once, a long time ago in a far away land
known as my foray into the automotive machine shop business with an
alcoholic partner. But, that is at least a two beer story!
Jim Hupy
Salem, Oregon

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 8:43 AM Bob Dunahugh yenko108@hotmail.com wrote:

I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from
the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine

block.

At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we
could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I have
laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher

in

the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has
measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the

shortest

already. Then there's another issue.  By shimming the distributor up. The
distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In
relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on the
driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on the
very end of that driven gear.)
As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor drive
gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what stop/stops?
Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the pick-up
coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some around.
But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN.  I've said for about a

year

now.  That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed
back then.
Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the
engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one.
Bob Dunahugh
78 Royale since 2003
4 real COPO Yenkos


GMCnet mailing list
Unsubscribe or Change List Options:


GMCnet mailing list
Unsubscribe or Change List Options:

Jim, You're correct: I examined a brand new shaft today, which had the stop in place (actually 2 push-on spring washers back-to-back). Since Ken Shaffer can pull his shaft out, those washers are no longer in place. Then I found among my jump a used shaft with those washers also missing (including scars where they'd been pulled off). That shaft shows, below the previous stop washers' location, wear where it seated about 1/2" into the oil pump. At the other end, there are scars from about 1" seated in the distributor shaft. My question now is, WHY is the stop necessary, other than for assembly, as you described? With the oil pump limiting downward motion and the distributor preventing upward travel, WHY are the washers essential? Just curious, really, Ken H. On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 1:46 PM James Hupy <jamesh1296@gmail.com> wrote: > Problem is NOT in the distributor! It is the drive shaft, and the spring > clip that is supposed to be located in that free zone between the top of > the oil pump and the engine block. I suspect that you could just get hold > of the distributor drive shaft, and a slight pull could have it in your > hand. Which is NOT HOW it should be. It should remain in the engine when > you invert the engine like you do when torquing the crank bearings, etc. It > is usually the next to the last thing that I install when buttoning up the > lower end of an engine. > Been bitten by that gremlin once, a long time ago in a far away land > known as my foray into the automotive machine shop business with an > alcoholic partner. But, that is at least a two beer story! > Jim Hupy > Salem, Oregon > > On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 8:43 AM Bob Dunahugh <yenko108@hotmail.com> wrote: > > > I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from > > the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine > block. > > At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we > > could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I have > > laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher > in > > the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has > > measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the > shortest > > already. Then there's another issue. By shimming the distributor up. The > > distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In > > relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on the > > driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on the > > very end of that driven gear.) > > As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor drive > > gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what stop/stops? > > Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the pick-up > > coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some around. > > But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN. I've said for about a > year > > now. That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed > > back then. > > Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the > > engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one. > > Bob Dunahugh > > 78 Royale since 2003 > > 4 real COPO Yenkos > > _______________________________________________ > > GMCnet mailing list > > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: > > > _______________________________________________ > GMCnet mailing list > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: >
JH
James Hupy
Sat, Sep 11, 2021 7:18 PM

They are only there to keep the shaft from falling out when the engine is
inverted, as I previously described.
Now the $64,000 dollar question is, Do we really need those washers?
Short answer is, no, if you are not inverting the engine. So, we
probably are good to install the shaft with NO WASHERS,  drop in the
distributor and check for end play. If you have some, button it up and
fuggitabout it.
If you are anal like me, and strive for perfection in engine
building, you would pull the pan and oil pump, install the shaft with the
spring washers in the correct position, button it back up, and be not 1 bit
better off for the effort. But that is just me. Please use your best
judgment here.
Jim Hupy
Salem, Oregon

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 11:06 AM Ken Henderson hend4800@bellsouth.net wrote:

Jim,

You're correct:  I examined a brand new shaft today, which had the stop in
place (actually 2 push-on spring washers back-to-back).  Since Ken Shaffer
can pull his shaft out, those washers are no longer in place.  Then I found
among my jump a used shaft with those washers also missing (including scars
where they'd been pulled off).  That shaft shows, below the previous stop
washers' location, wear where it seated about 1/2" into the oil pump.  At
the other end, there are scars from about 1" seated in the distributor
shaft.

My question now is, WHY is the stop necessary, other than for assembly, as
you described?  With the oil pump limiting downward motion and the
distributor preventing upward travel, WHY are the washers essential?

Just curious, really,

Ken H.

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 1:46 PM James Hupy jamesh1296@gmail.com wrote:

Problem is NOT in the distributor! It is the drive shaft, and the spring
clip that is supposed to be located in that free zone between the top of
the oil pump and the engine block. I suspect that you could just get hold
of the distributor drive shaft, and a slight pull could have it in your
hand. Which is NOT HOW it should be. It should remain in the engine when
you invert the engine like you do when torquing the crank bearings, etc.

It

is usually the next to the last thing that I install when buttoning up

the

lower end of an engine.
Been bitten by that gremlin once, a long time ago in a far away

land

known as my foray into the automotive machine shop business with an
alcoholic partner. But, that is at least a two beer story!
Jim Hupy
Salem, Oregon

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 8:43 AM Bob Dunahugh yenko108@hotmail.com wrote:

I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from
the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine

block.

At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we
could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I

have

laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher

in

the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has
measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the

shortest

already. Then there's another issue.  By shimming the distributor up.

The

distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In
relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on

the

driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on

the

very end of that driven gear.)
As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor

drive

gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what

stop/stops?

Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the

pick-up

coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some

around.

But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN.  I've said for about a

year

now.  That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed
back then.
Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the
engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one.
Bob Dunahugh
78 Royale since 2003
4 real COPO Yenkos


GMCnet mailing list
Unsubscribe or Change List Options:


GMCnet mailing list
Unsubscribe or Change List Options:


GMCnet mailing list
Unsubscribe or Change List Options:

They are only there to keep the shaft from falling out when the engine is inverted, as I previously described. Now the $64,000 dollar question is, Do we really need those washers? Short answer is, no, if you are not inverting the engine. So, we probably are good to install the shaft with NO WASHERS, drop in the distributor and check for end play. If you have some, button it up and fuggitabout it. If you are anal like me, and strive for perfection in engine building, you would pull the pan and oil pump, install the shaft with the spring washers in the correct position, button it back up, and be not 1 bit better off for the effort. But that is just me. Please use your best judgment here. Jim Hupy Salem, Oregon On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 11:06 AM Ken Henderson <hend4800@bellsouth.net> wrote: > Jim, > > You're correct: I examined a brand new shaft today, which had the stop in > place (actually 2 push-on spring washers back-to-back). Since Ken Shaffer > can pull his shaft out, those washers are no longer in place. Then I found > among my jump a used shaft with those washers also missing (including scars > where they'd been pulled off). That shaft shows, below the previous stop > washers' location, wear where it seated about 1/2" into the oil pump. At > the other end, there are scars from about 1" seated in the distributor > shaft. > > My question now is, WHY is the stop necessary, other than for assembly, as > you described? With the oil pump limiting downward motion and the > distributor preventing upward travel, WHY are the washers essential? > > Just curious, really, > > Ken H. > > On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 1:46 PM James Hupy <jamesh1296@gmail.com> wrote: > > > Problem is NOT in the distributor! It is the drive shaft, and the spring > > clip that is supposed to be located in that free zone between the top of > > the oil pump and the engine block. I suspect that you could just get hold > > of the distributor drive shaft, and a slight pull could have it in your > > hand. Which is NOT HOW it should be. It should remain in the engine when > > you invert the engine like you do when torquing the crank bearings, etc. > It > > is usually the next to the last thing that I install when buttoning up > the > > lower end of an engine. > > Been bitten by that gremlin once, a long time ago in a far away > land > > known as my foray into the automotive machine shop business with an > > alcoholic partner. But, that is at least a two beer story! > > Jim Hupy > > Salem, Oregon > > > > On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 8:43 AM Bob Dunahugh <yenko108@hotmail.com> wrote: > > > > > I told Ken Shaffer last night. To mark a stick. As to the distance from > > > the top of the intermediate oil pump shaft. To the top of the engine > > block. > > > At the distributor hole. He then came to my house this morning. So, we > > > could compare the distance between his 455. And a rebuilt 455 that I > have > > > laying around here. On an engine stand. Ken's shaft is .470-inch higher > > in > > > the block than mine. Ken S intermediate shaft is 8.062 in. Ken H has > > > measured two shafts. At 8.125, and 8.187 in. So, Ken S saft is the > > shortest > > > already. Then there's another issue. By shimming the distributor up. > The > > > distributor drive gear is running .470 in higher than it should be. In > > > relationship to the cam gear. Not good. I need to put some bluing on > the > > > driven gear. Just to see how bad it is. (The gear pattern will be on > the > > > very end of that driven gear.) > > > As another note. When the engine is running. The distributor > drive > > > gears. Are pulling the distributor main shaft down. So, what > stop/stops? > > > Are keeping that main shaft. Down ward forces. From damaging the > pick-up > > > coil? I need to take a good distributor apart. I use to have some > around. > > > But Ken Saffer has destroyed ALL of them. GRIN. I've said for about a > > year > > > now. That something is up with that new oil pump. That Ken S installed > > > back then. > > > Engines, drivetrains, and suspensions are my thing. With all the > > > engines that I've built over a lot of years. This is truly a new one. > > > Bob Dunahugh > > > 78 Royale since 2003 > > > 4 real COPO Yenkos > > > _______________________________________________ > > > GMCnet mailing list > > > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: > > > > > _______________________________________________ > > GMCnet mailing list > > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: > > > _______________________________________________ > GMCnet mailing list > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: >
BD
Bob Dunahugh
Sat, Sep 11, 2021 7:54 PM

Put a 5/16 nut driver in a drill. With distributors out. Drove the oil pumps in both engines.  Good oil flow in each.
Bob Dunahugh

Put a 5/16 nut driver in a drill. With distributors out. Drove the oil pumps in both engines. Good oil flow in each. Bob Dunahugh
KH
Ken Henderson
Sat, Sep 11, 2021 9:44 PM

To be sure I don't drop something, like a nut driver, into the engine, I've
got a piece of thin PVC pipe, 1-1/4" IIRC, with small notch in one side to
clear the cam gear.  I put that down in the "distributor hole" to keep
anything dropped in there accessible for recovery.

JWID,

Ken H.

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 3:54 PM Bob Dunahugh yenko108@hotmail.com wrote:

Put a 5/16 nut driver in a drill. With distributors out. Drove the oil
pumps in both engines.  Good oil flow in each.
Bob Dunahugh


GMCnet mailing list
Unsubscribe or Change List Options:

To be sure I don't drop something, like a nut driver, into the engine, I've got a piece of thin PVC pipe, 1-1/4" IIRC, with small notch in one side to clear the cam gear. I put that down in the "distributor hole" to keep anything dropped in there accessible for recovery. JWID, Ken H. On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 3:54 PM Bob Dunahugh <yenko108@hotmail.com> wrote: > Put a 5/16 nut driver in a drill. With distributors out. Drove the oil > pumps in both engines. Good oil flow in each. > Bob Dunahugh > _______________________________________________ > GMCnet mailing list > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: >
BD
Bob Dunahugh
Sun, Sep 12, 2021 12:20 AM

I agree with Ken H. 100%.  DO NOT take chances. That nut driver was very well secured.  Bob Dunahugh


From: Ken Henderson hend4800@bellsouth.net
Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2021 4:44 PM
To: GMC Mail List gmclist@list.gmcnet.org
Subject: [GMCnet] Re: RE" Distributor seized up, ( Oiling )

To be sure I don't drop something, like a nut driver, into the engine, I've
got a piece of thin PVC pipe, 1-1/4" IIRC, with small notch in one side to
clear the cam gear.  I put that down in the "distributor hole" to keep
anything dropped in there accessible for recovery.

JWID,

Ken H.

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 3:54 PM Bob Dunahugh yenko108@hotmail.com wrote:

Put a 5/16 nut driver in a drill. With distributors out. Drove the oil
pumps in both engines.  Good oil flow in each.
Bob Dunahugh


GMCnet mailing list
Unsubscribe or Change List Options:


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I agree with Ken H. 100%. DO NOT take chances. That nut driver was very well secured. Bob Dunahugh ________________________________ From: Ken Henderson <hend4800@bellsouth.net> Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2021 4:44 PM To: GMC Mail List <gmclist@list.gmcnet.org> Subject: [GMCnet] Re: RE" Distributor seized up, ( Oiling ) To be sure I don't drop something, like a nut driver, into the engine, I've got a piece of thin PVC pipe, 1-1/4" IIRC, with small notch in one side to clear the cam gear. I put that down in the "distributor hole" to keep anything dropped in there accessible for recovery. JWID, Ken H. On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 3:54 PM Bob Dunahugh <yenko108@hotmail.com> wrote: > Put a 5/16 nut driver in a drill. With distributors out. Drove the oil > pumps in both engines. Good oil flow in each. > Bob Dunahugh > _______________________________________________ > GMCnet mailing list > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: > _______________________________________________ GMCnet mailing list Unsubscribe or Change List Options:
JH
James Hupy
Sun, Sep 12, 2021 1:16 AM

I use a socket that fits the hex drive, 1/4" drive. I grind an old
distributor drive shaft square th fit the socket drive end, and weld the
socket onto the oil pump drive shaft. I Chuck the shaft into my 3/8"
cordless drill and turn it onto counterclockwise direction. Then, I engage
the shaft in the engine with the socket and drive the oil pump for a few
minutes until I see oil flowing everywhere including the distributor drive
area.
Jim Hupy
Salem, Oregon

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 5:21 PM Bob Dunahugh yenko108@hotmail.com wrote:

I agree with Ken H. 100%.  DO NOT take chances. That nut driver was very
well secured.  Bob Dunahugh


From: Ken Henderson hend4800@bellsouth.net
Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2021 4:44 PM
To: GMC Mail List gmclist@list.gmcnet.org
Subject: [GMCnet] Re: RE" Distributor seized up, ( Oiling )

To be sure I don't drop something, like a nut driver, into the engine, I've
got a piece of thin PVC pipe, 1-1/4" IIRC, with small notch in one side to
clear the cam gear.  I put that down in the "distributor hole" to keep
anything dropped in there accessible for recovery.

JWID,

Ken H.

On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 3:54 PM Bob Dunahugh yenko108@hotmail.com wrote:

Put a 5/16 nut driver in a drill. With distributors out. Drove the oil
pumps in both engines.  Good oil flow in each.
Bob Dunahugh


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I use a socket that fits the hex drive, 1/4" drive. I grind an old distributor drive shaft square th fit the socket drive end, and weld the socket onto the oil pump drive shaft. I Chuck the shaft into my 3/8" cordless drill and turn it onto counterclockwise direction. Then, I engage the shaft in the engine with the socket and drive the oil pump for a few minutes until I see oil flowing everywhere including the distributor drive area. Jim Hupy Salem, Oregon On Sat, Sep 11, 2021, 5:21 PM Bob Dunahugh <yenko108@hotmail.com> wrote: > I agree with Ken H. 100%. DO NOT take chances. That nut driver was very > well secured. Bob Dunahugh > > ________________________________ > From: Ken Henderson <hend4800@bellsouth.net> > Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2021 4:44 PM > To: GMC Mail List <gmclist@list.gmcnet.org> > Subject: [GMCnet] Re: RE" Distributor seized up, ( Oiling ) > > To be sure I don't drop something, like a nut driver, into the engine, I've > got a piece of thin PVC pipe, 1-1/4" IIRC, with small notch in one side to > clear the cam gear. I put that down in the "distributor hole" to keep > anything dropped in there accessible for recovery. > > JWID, > > Ken H. > > On Sat, Sep 11, 2021 at 3:54 PM Bob Dunahugh <yenko108@hotmail.com> wrote: > > > Put a 5/16 nut driver in a drill. With distributors out. Drove the oil > > pumps in both engines. Good oil flow in each. > > Bob Dunahugh > > _______________________________________________ > > GMCnet mailing list > > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: > > > _______________________________________________ > GMCnet mailing list > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: > _______________________________________________ > GMCnet mailing list > Unsubscribe or Change List Options: >
KB
Ken Burton
Sun, Sep 12, 2021 9:05 AM

Does the direction that the distributor turns have anything to do with the upwards or downwards pull on the shaft and slinging of oil slinging up
along the shaft?  Are the shafts different between clock clock wise and counter clockwise rotation distributors?

I am out of my league here but I believe Olds distributors turn counter clockwise while Chevy and Cadillac distributors turn clockwise.  Would it be
possible to install a Chevy / Cadillac distributor in an Olds?

I can not see how it would work with a vacuum advance / centrifugal advance distributor.  They would have to pull the opposite direction.  On one
without vacuum advance (computer controlled advance) Maybe.

Feel free to tell me that I am all wrong.

Ken B.

Ken Burton - N9KB
76 Palm Beach
Hebron, Indiana

Does the direction that the distributor turns have anything to do with the upwards or downwards pull on the shaft and slinging of oil slinging up along the shaft? Are the shafts different between clock clock wise and counter clockwise rotation distributors? I am out of my league here but I believe Olds distributors turn counter clockwise while Chevy and Cadillac distributors turn clockwise. Would it be possible to install a Chevy / Cadillac distributor in an Olds? I can not see how it would work with a vacuum advance / centrifugal advance distributor. They would have to pull the opposite direction. On one without vacuum advance (computer controlled advance) Maybe. Feel free to tell me that I am all wrong. Ken B. -- Ken Burton - N9KB 76 Palm Beach Hebron, Indiana